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Tag: historical

More Technology of “The Sauder Diaries” – A Steampunk Dragon; What’s Not To Like?

Post Views: 484 Introduction This is the third part of a three-part set answering this Question From the Audience. So, without further ado, allow me to continue on discussing the various technologies that Hans encounters and uses, and evaluate “The Reasonable Plausibility Level” (RPL) of each. Science and Technology of “The Sauder Diaries – By Any Other Name” The “Dragon” One of the most memorable scenes in “The Sauder Diaries – By Any Other Name” is the dragon attack in the chapter titled “A Quiet Little Town”: “It came into view at the lighted edge of town, lumbering out of the night. The lights of the town glinted off its armoured hide as it advanced. It was easily two heights of a man to its shoulder, if not three, and double that…

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Questions From The Audience – July 25th, 2012

Post Views: 259 “I’d love to hear some more about ‘real world science’ versus ‘technology used in The Sauder Diaries’. How does it differ?” – Matt Jenkins Introduction This is the second part of a three-part set answering this Question From the Audience. In the first installment I got about halfway through the first novel in “The Sauder Diaries”, sub-titled “By Any Other Name”. So, without further ado, allow me to continue on discussing the various technologies that Hans encounters and uses, and evalutate “The Reasonable Plausibility Level” (RPL) of each. Science and Techology of “The Sauder Diaries – By Any Other Name”, Part 2 Double-barreled Flare gun The original flare gun was designed by American naval officer Edward Wilson Very (1847–1910). The system he developed and popularized…

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Questions From The Audience – July 10th, 2012

Post Views: 460 “I’d love to hear some more about ‘real world science’ versus ‘technology used in The Sauder Diaries’. How does it differ?” — Matt Jenkins Introduction One of the hallmarks of Steampunk is that it is often typified as “Victorian Science-Fiction”. In otherwords, the “science” component of the story needs to be within the scope of Victorian understanding. For example, Jule’s Verne’s “20,000 Leagues Under the Sea” is all well thought-out and reasonably plausible; the only hitch was that no one actually had the –ability– to build a ship like the Nautilus. The science theory supported the design, but the metalurgic reality did not. I’d like to draw your attention to a phrase I just used: “reasonably plausible”. What I term as the “The Reasonable Plausibility…

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Book Review – “The Electric City: The Stehelins of New France”

Post Views: 253 The electric city: The Stehelins of New France by Paul H Stehelin My rating: 5 of 5 stars Fantastic book for anyone interested in Canada in the Victorian Era as well as the indirect influences that Europe’s political and social issues which impacted on “New France”. Electric lights, hand-built railway systems, carving civilization from wilderness … an excellent read made better by the fact it is all true. View all my reviews

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